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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
dollar funded battery marker a-123 systems is up for sale. the winning bid goes to -- china. so i asked was red china rising why u.s. taxpayers have to finance their battery companies. here's ann lee, author of "what the u.s. can learn from china," professor of nyu and visiting professor from beijing university and author kwof "death by china" and cnbc contributor. ann, let me go to you first. if we, the u.s. taxpayer and government are dumb enough to build a goofy battery company that goes bankrupt why shouldn't china scoop it up? >> i think this is a great story. first of all, taxpayer money wasn't wasted. all that money from the government went to help property plant and equipment here on american soil. and it's staying in america. chinese companies are not going to pack it up and move it to china. it's staying in the united states. they are going to hire u.s. employees to run it. that means more american prosperity. that's what we want. i think this is a win-win situation. the company that bought this is basically like the warren buffett of china. >> all right. let me get there. the
think the world will look like. it's fascinating. it shows china on the rise, the west in decline and china overtaking the united states in size of economy by the year 2030. here are the key findings of the new intel report. it's interesting reading. a majority of the world's population by 2030 will be out of poverty for the first time in world history. there will be wars over food and water and natural resores. populations will continue to rise and there will be recurring global economic crises but when you think about this, you think about how far we're going here. you've got asia, china in particular will be dominant. it will be stronger than its been anytime since middleages. there will be no more pax americana as its known. china will be a big driver and india will be growing like china is today. they talk about how the world is changing. it's like no other time since the french revolution. remember in the late 18th century, the industrial revolution, except it's happening more quickly. it's taking a tenth of the time for china and asia to rise quickly. let me read to you som
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
for its missile program in china. we know they buy things for their gas centrifuge program in china. some things are made in germany. probably made in the u.s. china has been a major gap in this whole system. on sanctions and north korea could face tougher action from china might constrict some of its ability to buy things that it absolutely needs for its nuclear programs. jon: you think it is likely american-made technology is helping north korea with its missile program? >> could be. i don't know the missile program nearly as well as the nuclear but what north korea does, it uses china a sense as a transshipment point because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been m
is that coming from because i see china coming back a little, maybe europe's done going down, we seem to be a little bit stalled. somebody's building something around this world. >> i think it's a matter of jabil being very competitive in the markets we serve and having sufficient diversification so that if one part of our business, for instance networking on telecommunications may be going through a lull or slower period with government spending and bess spending, capital spending down, we have some other parts of our business that are doing extremely well. you mentioned some of the mechanics business we're involved in which we call our consumer technology business. that has nothing to do with electronics so we don't have to sell any electronic hardware for those businesses to perform well. parts of our business are a reflection of the economy and other parts of our business are growing very robustly. so i'm very hopeful for the balance of the year and, you know, i think the company is diversified enough to take advantage of whatever opportunities are out there. >> okay. i am so glad
. >> brian: millions of dollars in a green company only to sell it to china? stewart varney with another waste of your money. he's coming up now. ♪ it's my favorite time of year again and now -- i got a great new way to get deals. it's called bankamerideals, from bank of america. i choose the cash back deals in my mobile or online banking. i just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and i get as much as 15% cash back -- put into my account. this is cash back on top of other rewards i already get. best of all -- it's free. happy holidays. [ male announcer ] introducing bankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? ♪ >> gretchen: if you are just waking up it is 17 minutes past the top of the is it like a fire sale on america interest? china buying up u.s. compani
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
campaign saying president obama was responsible for jobs, cheep jobs, being sent over to china. something that never happened. here's parts of it. let's listen. >> obama took gm and kries ler into bankruptcy and sold chrysler who were going to build jeeps in china. mitt romney will fight for every american job. >> of course, that's the jeep ad, michael crowley. sometimes these guys get caught in realtime because the governor of the state and everybody said didn't happen. >> right. well, chris, this is one of those wonderful examples where something can be factually accurate and still a complete lie. in other words, the language in that ad i believe stands up. that chrysler was going to begin making jeeps in china. >> for chinese. >> right. right. it made perfect sense. a lot of auto-companies do this. obviously, that's the clear implication of the ad. so the fundamental message is a lie. they just covered thems enough with the language. maybe they thought they wouldn't get called out on it. i think they were desperate to win ohio. maybe it was a net loss. >> i think it's one of those thin
rate in china, and in a few years it will surpass the u.s. what it means, coming up. >>> dozens of homes damaged in the south, ripping off roofs and damaging trees. more to come. stamp watch, straight ahead. >>> lots to talk about this morning. the next two hours, we'll talk with steve israel. jeff sessions, sandy levin, rahm emanuel and businessman javier paolomarez, ed burns, frankie monday easy, and chuck leavell. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, everybody. "starting point" this morning, angry, united. bracing for protests in michigan as the state is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. as many as 10,000 unionized workers expected at the state capitol to voice their disapproval of the measure. some of them teachers, two detroit area school districts shut down for the day as hundreds of teachers plan to join the protest. president obama brought it up during a trip to a daimler truck factory in redford, michigan. this is what he said. >> this so-called right to work law, they don't have to do with economics, everything to do with politics. what th
of santa's route. he follows every new year's. he just was in russia. now he's over the great wall of china. previous to that, he made his way to australia. you can see him flying past the famed opera house there. so he's delivered all of his presents in australia. all of the presents in russia. all the presents in japan, and also south korea, and, of course, now he's busy in china, on his way, of course, over here to the united states. we'll keep you posted. >>> wreaths across america. it's a program that's become part of the healing process for military families around the holidays. today's giving in focus takes a look at a tree farm in maine that helps turn greece into finding peace. >> i know when chris died, we kept thinking about how we were going to remember him. and we kept thinking that his spirit was moving through the trees every time you saw them moving. i seem to be drawn to maine even though i've never lived here. it's pretty amazing. >> we're in the wreath business and have been since 1971. columbia falls is a little town in coastal washington county. the perfect little count
like china? >> well, take the robotic device . this is a medical device. under the obama care law medical devices will be subject to attacks because they have to pay for obama care. this is the sort of thing that if we keep doing will suppress the growth of technology in this country, and then there is the issue of immigration policy. a lot of this technology drefn drefn -- t driven by engineers and silicon valley has been the result of immigration in the united states. if we don't stand in front of these things we can grow. >> thank you. >>> coming up in our second half hour a look ahead to 2013.k is the economy poised for a come back, or will slow growth and high unemployment continue to drag us down? and get ready for obama care. what you need to know as some key provisions kick in. >>> it was terrifying moments at a phoenix bank. workers arrived to find one of their co-workers with a device around her neck, but the device was harmless. she was taken hostage the night before and held against her will overnight. police say the man who did it took her to the bank this morning and
in germany or alabama. want them in lexington, kentucky or china? >> you mentioned germany. volkswagen opened a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're ge
can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude imports rose to the second highest daily rate on record. analysts say this is further evidence of the chinese recover. and i saw this story on -- every once in a while i check tweeting. >> i saw it on google, too. kayla tausche reporting -- >> kayla beat nick dunn. >> nick dunn was quoting kayla. >>
to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that it leads to higher wages, that it leads to marginally -- >> but what's wrong with giving people the freedom to
are not as bad with fiscal cliff. china not as bad as we though, u.s. very strong. so nike, if it goes back to 97, it means we're going to have a real bad couple of days in my view. look at red hat. red hat is a technology company that is deeply involved in the cloud. they, too, had a better than expected number, as did oracle in the cloud. so these are my two tales for the trading today, david. if you pick the best of the best and they go down, you'll really have a couple of -- >> when it comes to the so-called cloud play and the use of it in the competition here, is that one of the key names? >> yes, it allows you to manage cloud in a cheap -- an anti-microsoft business. their partner is sales force.com. i'm really using these as tells. in other words, these are the ones where there's natural buyers. as we just found out how good things are. it wasn't like we found out a month ago. we just found out last night. if they have resilience, the market is going to be more resilient than people think. if they give up the ghost, i think next week's going to be difficult, too. >> all right. we'll be wat
and china and then made right to work law here. it means it's a gap between the wealth and the workers. workers have a right to expect liberal wages, health care, education care, the right to vote protected, and educate their children. these rights are reasonable and should be enforced. >> reverend jackson, you and i have known each other a long time. did you ever think you would be in michigan leading a protest against right to work? >> i really did not. i think that the tea party has 150-year-old roots between what is -- the right it organize, collective bargaining and states rights. i never thought it would go this far north, and, yet, these workers in this state must fight back and draw a line in the sand. that's why i'm going to address a major one-day strike, maybe a one-day march on washington for massive and action to bring about the ship in the flow of the wind. >> reverend jesse jackson, bob king from the united autoworkers. thank you very much. i know it's a cold day. thanks for joining us from michigan. >> thank you. >>> and let's make a deal. can president obama and the sp
what he did before he was the governor of michigan. >> he shipped jobs it china. >> he was at gateway computers. which by the way, i think we can stop at gateway because everybody knows it was just a crap computer. and then he just shipped all the jobs right to taiwan. it should have been like a coming atraction for michigan, looking at what he did at gateway. and people say, well, mike, how did this guy get in there? i mean, this is a state that voted for obama ten points over romney. and i think honestly, i think people didn't take 2010 serious enough. and i think a lot of people were -- i think a lot of the base was depressed because at least the perception of what president obama was doing in that first year or two, he was trying to get along, he was trying to be a good guy. and it's like -- >> no public option. no universal health care. that's what the country wanted. >> right. >> but there was a perception there wasn't a good enough fight -- >> and putting a guy from goldman sachs, larry summers, in charge of our economic policy. >> what's the plan? you have a history in terms o
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
's no question the usa economy is going to go into recession. we closed down our manufacturing in china and relocated our manufacturing to the usa. for other companies to consider following our lead, they need to trust that our leaders in washington will actually lead. think outside the box. create incentive for businesses to invest in the u.s. economy. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 you should've seen me today. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 when the spx crossed above its 50-day moving average, tdd# 1-800-345-2550 i saw the trend. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 it looked really strong. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 and i jumped right on it. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 tdd# 1-800-345-2550 since i've switched to charles schwab... tdd# 1-800-345-2550 ...i've been finding opportunities like this tdd# 1-800-345-2550 a lot more easily. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 like today, tdd# 1-800-345-2550 i was using their streetsmart edge trading platform tdd# 1-800-345-2550 and i saw a double bottom form. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 i called one of their trading specialists tdd# 1-800-345-2550 and i bounced a few ideas off of him. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 they're always
china, the north's closest ally, says it regrets the launch and is urging north korea to put a stop to its missile program. japan says the launch is unacceptable. norad says it appeared to have put a satellite into orbit which would be a huge breakthrough for the north koreans. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? and also to build my career. so i'm not about to always let my frequent bladder urges, or the worry my pipes might leak get in the way of my busy lifestyle. that's why i take care, with vesicare. once-daily vesicare can help control your bladder muscle and is proven to treat overactive bladder with symptoms of frequent urges and leaks day and night. if you have certain stomach or glaucoma problems, or trouble empty
there is large u.s. presence. south korea is calling for more u.s. sanctions. the most important, china, they are saying want a moderate and prudent response. may well go to the u.n. security council this morning. back to you. martha: so how important is it for north korea's missile regime, missile program i should say they were able to launch this weapon successfully? they have seen several failures in the past? >> reporter: well it is a major scientific achievement if you look at it on that level even though a lot of their people are starving in the country. from what the experts are saying they're still a long way off from being able to fire a ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead. there is problems with the heat from reentry, things like that. but it's, they are moving towards that ballistic missile which could threaten in the future the u.s. mainland. but it does seem a political success for the new leader, kim jong-un, this young new leader. he pushed for this rocket to be tested and for once it has been successful. back to you. martha: david, thank you very much. we'll have mo
. they would just use other weapons, like they have in china, where they go in the classrooms and used swords and knives and start killing people? . that would probably be a bad idea too. so i think it's just education and trying to curb things that might influence people from doing such. host: what are some suggestions for that, jason? caller: it's hard to say, because a variety of people get into a variety of situations. whatever it is causes them to do things like that. better time spent talking to your kids, more money spent on mental health, things of that nature, i would say. otherwise, you are just point to end up with these situations occurring again. host: here's a story from cnn's talking about this recent attack where a man wielding a knife entered a school. injured 22 children and adults was also wounded. some of those kids are in critical condition. no deaths. does that make a difference to you? caller: certainly. i really don't know what you can do in a situation like that. if you look at gun-control laws such as in phoenix, arizona, where they have certain laws, it has not gone
making $1 in mexico in factories. later burma and later china. so suddenly they have a narrative saying mooirn autoworkers make more money than people in mexico and china. those workers have no rights. ordinary citizens in those countries have no rights to change their traditions and now we have ap narrative saying american autoworkers make too mitch but they don't. and point two was to undo labor law. regan came in 1981 and regan, as we famously know. >> let me stop you there on that nearive. undoing the labor lay starts much earlier. >> absolutely. >> i'm just trying to -- >> i know, but the 47 is when it really starts. to say what happens in '47. in some ways '47 -- the opening thing in this batting is really '47. >> i'll start at 35. no one understands how this works. >> hear that america. none of you understand this. >> gun safety and restoring american workers from a middle class standard it's all on a continuum. 1935, the national relation's act is passed. the mlra. by 1947, the taft hartley act is passed and that begins a systematic rollback of labor law in this country but it t
an issue out of china, but we lost a lot of jobs to southern states in the united states. so we're absolutely going to market -- michigan, there is no better work force in the country than michigan. i'd argue no better work force in the world than michigan. we'll welcome business with open arms, bring those opportunities to our state. we have a beautiful state, fantastic people. >> brian: mr. speaker, thank you for joining us. best of luck for everyone to calm down in michigan and look ahead. thanks so much. >> great to be with you. thanks. >> brian: the number one country song for the last two weeks running. ♪ baby you a song ♪ you make me want to roll my windows down ♪ ♪ and croon. >> brian: they've been here since 2:00 o'clock in the morning. they'll be here live. let's check in with bill hemmer who also got here at 2:00 o'clock in the morning and is in a rock'n'roll band. >> i'm looking for the peanut but ther and jelly later today. didn't we have that last year? >> brian: yes, you d. bring your own jiffy. >> will do. thank you. breaking news on the economy. what the
back -- so it's a vast multitude on the planet but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history because all of the conclusions at the time it was way better and more perfect and for the first time ever in the history of the planet, an entire continent got to vote on how they and their posterity would be, and there were lots of exclusions from our perspective that we wouldn't exist as a democratic country in the democratic world but for that. i would say it's the hinge of all modern history. before democra
at this hour's hot shots. wisconsin, a cnn ireporter takes a picture of snow-covered trees. >>> in china, christmas tr ornaments are on display. in florida, packages are shipped on what they expect to be the busiest day of the year. and in japan, monkeys cuddle together in the snow. hot shots, pictures from around the world. >> those monkeys in japan, not the only monkeys in the news today. jeanne moos has proof that nothing perks up a hum drum shopping day like a monkey in a fancy coat. >> you go to ikea expecting cheap furniture. >> this is so bizarre. why is there a monkey at ikea. >> there he was running around in an outfit that freaked everyone out. >> it's faux fur, not a shearli shearling. >> double breasted, no less. the tweets started to fly. anyone lose their monkey at ikea? actually, yeah. the owner was shopping inside the store when monkey managed to get out of his crate and then out of the car. >> all the people were trying to, like, call it towards them, but it was very scared. it was darting all over the place. they were trying to get it away from cars. >> his diaper only
going to compete with china with 1.3 billion people? the answer is we can have the entire world at our disposal by creating conditions that the best people in the wormed can come to the united states and study. >> and stay and start businesses. >> two, then we have to focus on faction, particularly the corporate tax reform, to get a system which is simpler and promotes efficiency and makes it easier for businesses to compete if the world. third, then we have to -- that will create -- that will be enormous. third, then there is a infrastructure investment that needs to be made. this is very important because in the context of the kiped of budget deal we'll get where we'll spend less going forward as businesses, we have to think about what our values are with respect to what we'll spend money on. the most important things we can spend money on is infrastructure to again create -- make investments in the future rather than just short-term spending. and then twin that with important support for research, basic research, and for higher education as drew talked about. and for education. thos
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)